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Wednesday, 05 March, 2003

He became so tired of trying to win the acceptance of those around him, that he thought of killing himself.

Wednesday, 05 March, 2003

Lord Jordan, former General Secretary of the International Confederation of Free Trades Unions, was speaking at an evening reception in his honour at IofC’s London headquarters, organised by Caux Initiatives for Business (CIB) on 4 March.

Wednesday, 12 February, 2003
Bishop Michael Marshall

Bishop Michael Marshall, Assistant Bishop of London, opened the Greencoat Forum on 11 February by suggesting that the words "They had everything to live with, and nothing to live for" might be an epitaph for modern society.

Wednesday, 05 February, 2003

Hope Sierra Leone has held a peace and reconciliation seminar in Makeni, the former stronghold of the Revolutionary United Front.

Wednesday, 01 January, 2003
Vasu Vaitla

IofC's long engagement with the UN entered a new phase in the 1990s with the opening of an office adjacent to the UN headquarters. Vasu Vaitla took up responsibilities for this office in July 2002, serving until 2005. Will Jenkins asked Vasu to share his vision for change.

Thursday, 26 September, 2002

‘Disaster averted; opportunity missed’ was the way Geoffrey Lean, Environment Editor of the Independent on Sunday, summed up the Earth Summit on sustainable development in Johannesburg, when he spoke on ‘Outcomes of the Earth Summit’ at a Greencoat Forum at the IofC centre in London

Thursday, 01 August, 2002
Hugh Nowell

Hugh Nowell has made a vocation of rising to the unexpected, as Paul Williams and Mary Lean discovered.

Thursday, 01 August, 2002
R D Mathur

Retirement hasn't slowed the pace of Cornelio Sommaruga, former President of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Andrew Stallybrass discovers.

Saturday, 20 July, 2002

Alan Weeks, Australia, has since 1990 worked with the parties in the process to reach peace in the civil war on the Papua New Guinea island province of Bougainville.

Saturday, 01 June, 2002

Theatrical success didn't make Vendela Tyndale-Biscoe happy. Nor did drugs and partying. Mary Lean finds out more.

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